The Interview Is The Last Place You’ll Find A Great Employee

Most businesses hire out of short term desperation, and pay a long term price. How much time went into your last bad hiring decision - compared to how much energy you've spent dealing with it.

As a small business owner there's no more important decision you can make. And the painful truth comes out year after year, 7 out of 10 employees are disengaged from their work. So how do you find the other 3?

The process starts long before you ever give someone an interview - long before you ever have a job opening. Great hiring is the result of having a great hiring system - a set of systems actually. But there are some simple things you can do today to start moving in the right direction:

1. Don't Write A Job Posting, First Create A Position Agreement

Before you're inundated with resumes from the wrong people, start by envisioning the right person. What characteristics do they have, what skills, experience, attitude? Don't focus on what tasks you need them to do, instead think about what results you want them to achieve.

Your vision is the key to aligning where the business is going with the personal ambitions of the people in it.

2. Make Sure You're Hiring For A Job That Should Exist

Where is this position on your org chart? If you don't have one, use our 30 day free trial to build one. Part of the process here is figuring out what specific qualities you need in that person to take the position.

3. Make Sure That Job Is In Line With Your Three Year Vision

If you don't have a clear vision, how can anyone feel like they're a part of it? Your vision is the key to aligning where the business is going with the personal ambitions of the people in it.

Now you can write a job posting, and you can make it about their dreams, not your needs. Imagine the life your dream candidate wants for themselves and tell them a (true) story about why working for you will get them closer to it. Someone who has found their calling will quickly learn whatever skills you need them to learn along the way.

Taking these steps will make it far more likely to hear something like this the next time someone shows up for an interview: "Sorry, I'm just a little more than nervous to be here. I don't know how you did that but you posted the opening I've been searching for for a long time".

Now instead of using the interview to see if there's a reason to hire them, you can use it to see if there's a reason not to.

Topics: Hiring

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Jonathan Raymond

Written by Jonathan Raymond

Jonathan was a frequent contributor to the EMyth blog from 2011-2015. His articles focus on marketing, branding, and organizational culture.

See all of Jonathan's posts.